Let’s use the word THOUGH naturally in conversation!

 

How to use THOUGH: formally

A lot of English learners use this key word at the beginning of the sentence… but do you know what?

We hardly ever use it at the beginning because it’s too formal.

For example:

Though I have a headache, I’ll never miss an English lesson.

Though it’s raining outside, I’m still going to go hiking.

These sentences are grammatically correct, but it sounds like English from the 1800s.

Is it possible to make those sentences informal? YES!

Let’s use “Even though” in those same sentences:

EVEN though I have a headache, I’ll never miss an English lesson.

EVEN though it’s raining outside, I’m still going to go hiking.

But what about using just “though” by itself?

 

How to use THOUGH: conversationally

When you use this key word conversationally, it’s going to be at the end of the sentence.

Her words are happy, [but look at her eyes though.]

In the video lesson, I mention that the second part of the sentence is the opposite of the first part of the sentence.

We often make a second sentence instead of using “but.”

Let’s take a look at some other examples:

This cake looks pretty. It tastes awful though.

Learning English with Vanessa is good. Her classes are really early though.

The traffic accident was pretty bad. I couldn’t stop looking though.

Did you notice that the key word is at the end of each sentence?

 

Now it’s your turn.

In the comments below this video, answer the question.

Can you make a sentence using “Even though” and “Though”?

Do you want to be my personal student?